Cycles of the Job

I am a cyclist. It’s a deeply ingrained part of my identity.  Riding and racing bikes serves many purposes in my life.  It gives me an outlet for my frustrations, either alone or with a group out on the roads.  My nagging competitiveness is satisfied, at least temporarily, when a race on my calendar comes around.  However, probably most important, is how cycling grounds me and serves as a reminder of many life lessons drawn upon from my past

We all know that work, especially work within the nonprofit world, can be both exhilarating and, at times, draining.  It isn’t so much a job as a calling to do good, to better a neighborhood, serve food to those in need, or simply help your fellow man in some facet.  When someone has such a deep attachment to an activity, the tendency is to slip into tunnel vision and ignore many other parts of life.  A healthy balance needs to be found, you should remain calm in the face of a challenge, and endure when the situation calls for it.

The same idea applies to cycling, and it is why I find comfort and strength in how it relates to my everyday life.  The concept of training to race is something that needs a degree of commitment, desire, and foresight.  It’s a challenge by nature that can be overcome individually, but having a few friendly faces along for the ride certainly passes the time a bit more quickly!  While training for an event or working towards a professional goal, if there isn’t another part of your life pulling you from that mindset, you will eventually burn out. It’s important to take a step back once in awhile to recharge both physically and mentally, finding that all-important balance.

Finally, after all of your hard work, race day arrives! You might be nervous, scared, or just raring to get out there and show them what you’re made of!

Image result for funny cycling gif

In cycling and your chosen profession, it’s important to remain calm in the face of a challenge. This may be the race you’ve been planning for all these months, or a big report on data from your volunteer program. If you’re confident, have laid the groundwork for success, and endure the challenge ahead, at the end of the day you will have accomplished your goal.
Remember to take some time to recharge and avoid the dreaded burnout. Know that you aren’t in this alone! Your co workers, family, and friends are here to support you in reaching that goal. Finally, after putting in all the hard work ahead of time, the accomplishments that were set out to be achieved long ago will come to you more easily than you’d ever think.

Advertisements