Members in Action! – Nora

“Am I too old for this?”  A question Nora Skiver, an AmeriCorps member at Habitat for Humanity Choptank, asked herself. Nora shares her wins and efforts at her organization.

“At the beginning of this journey with Volunteer Maryland, I admit my thoughts were: “What am I getting myself into, Am I too old for this?” Guess what? I have since changed that perspective. When I make a presentation to recruit volunteers I am enthusiastic and excited. I am encouraged by the response of my volunteers and how much they are enjoying their experiences. I have increased the group presentations and am learning to network with local organizations to share volunteers when they request other volunteer experience”.

She ends with this thought, “ …life presents us the opportunity for us to give in order to get”.

Nora has also met other clients and volunteers like herself, who continuously prove her change in perspective.

According to her, Loretta Smith, a 71 years old had applied with Habitat Choptank’s Neighborhood Revitalization Program to assist with replacing a rotted porch floor. With the support of the organization she replaced all of her own door locks and did some of the painting. Nora learnt that every year Loretta, makes Christmas breakfast for Clients at a nursing home for low income clients, and is a volunteer at a Public Library. She does not want to be called a “senior”

 Nora is known to encourage and engage her volunteers such as recruiting active volunteers to bake cookies for 60 construction volunteers. And with the help of a board member had the cookies delivered. She continues to challenge herself to find innovative ways to inspire her volunteers. Some ways of achieving this are, viewing webinars such as “Engaging Volunteers of the future” and reading books like “The New Breed: Second Edition: Understanding and Equipping the 21st Century Volunteers.”

 20170920_122940There really is no excuse for not serving your community. We all have skills that can be of service to the community. All we need is the heart. We have many AmeriCorps members from different age brackets, background, race and creed with heart currently serving.



Members in Action! – Sophia

Sophia an AmeriCorps Member at Ulman Cancer Fund (UCF) whose passion for raising awareness for UCF has helped her developed skills that many seek. Being a volunteer coordinator requires various skills, public speaking is one of them. Sophia shares how her experience so far helped her to hone this skill.

She says, “In the month of December, I was able to travel back to my Alma mater, Geneseo and speak about 4K for Cancer and my involvement with UCF. I have been working on my goal of improving my public speaking quite a bit this month through presentations to the UCF staff and also through outreach opportunities that I have helped out with. Speaking for an hour as a part of the All-College-Hour Speaker Series at Geneseo was a huge test to the work that I had put into my public speaking and it was a really exciting and challenging experience for me. I was able to share my personal story as well as the stories that I have heard throughout my involvement with Ulman that inspire me to keep working with UCF. My goal of the speech was to inspire others in this community to get involved with UCF and hopefully other types of service in and outside of their community. I was really happy with how the speech went and I spoke to a few people afterwards who really wanted to get involved with UCF. It felt great to be able to see the improvement in my public speaking since the start of the service year and someone who attended the speech reached out to inquire about having me come and present at their university.

Another skill necessary to be a volunteer coordinator is being able to inspire volunteers to commit their time and effort, the challenging part being recruiting and retaining this volunteers.

For Martin Luther King day, UCF hosted a day of service well attended by 56 people of all ages. According to her,the UCF tradition of the Dedication Circle was an opportunity to hear the people that inspired the volunteers to give up their day off to serve with us. Some of the names said were familiar ones and some were names I had never heard before, but it was so inspiring to take a moment like that in which we were reminded the importance of what we were doing.”

Sophia goes further to share about one of the volunteers that served on MLK Day.

“A woman came to the MLK day of service after hearing about it through her company. She showed up with her kids and not knowing much about UCF, still took time out of her life to attend. I spoke with her about the UCF mission and my involvement and she told me about her life and where she had come from. Like me, she was new to Baltimore and looking for a community. She not only stayed the entire day, but was one of the most dedicated volunteers as her and her kids were knee deep in garbage cleaning out an area near the UCF House. She hopes to get more involved and told me how inspired she was by the UCF mission.”

However recruiting and learning what inspires volunteers is only a part of the job. Sophia faces the challenge of engaging volunteers, as volunteer opportunities are inconsistent.

She explains how they focused on creating an impactful opportunity.

“The greatest challenge this month was trying to figure out how to continue to engage volunteers after the initial interaction. I noticed that a lot of volunteer lose interest after the first event because our volunteer opportunities are less consistent. I don’t want to lose the interest of the volunteers, but still want to make sure that the work the volunteers are doing is meaningful and is making an impact. Lauriann and I have started doing Chemo Care Bag Builds every other week so that we will always have the bags ready to give to the Patient Navigators and also there will always be a volunteer opportunity for volunteers to get involved in.”

Volunteer Management is a cycle, the process is not stagnant and needs to be readdressed on all levels.  From the Big Picture to the Implementation of volunteer engagement, a Volunteer Coordinator or Manager is ultimatum responsible for relationship building and without constant care and attention eventually the relationships can end.  Sophia understands the importance of this constant need to nurture the relationship with new and excited volunteers and she’s up to the challenge to inspire them to stay engaged with the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults. #PickmeupWednesday


Members in Action! -Andrew

During the month of November the spirit of giving was thriving throughout the state of Maryland.
Andrew Zagwodzki‘s site, End hunger in Calvert County Warehouse successfully prepared over 4000 Holiday meal boxes and turkeys to 43 partner feeding organizations. 600 of the Holiday Meal Boxes was packed by the Chesapeake Beach/North Beach Town council. These meals were scheduled to go down to Lusby which is at the other end of the county. According to Andrew,”When the group was done packing, and we told them where these meals were going, they were blown away. They could not believe that they packed over 600 boxes, but on top of that, where it was going. They did not realize the need through the county. It really opened their eyes, to be able to see the impact of serving at the warehouse, and who was positively affected by it.”
Andrew further explains, “For me personally, it was difficult to be able to think everything through. Such as counting out specific number of green beans that needed to be packed for a county Holiday Meal and then figuring out where to make up the difference if we did not have enough. I survived though, thanks to the help of my amazing site supervisors and our volunteers everyone was able to obtain their meals in time for thanksgiving.”
Volunteers efforts reaching far and wide throughout Calvert County, This is a good example of how to bring volunteers in to the organizations mission and help them see their impact on the community


Members in Action! – Mallory

“In the face of critical need in our communities, many of us feel concern: but when does that concern move us to act? At the story telling workshop hosted by Project Change and CASA, we tackled the challenge of telling our stories of service. Mallory’s story of service and engaging the community’s compassion compelled listeners.

Mallory Jones is the ​AmeriCorps member serving with Volunteer Maryland as a ​volunteer coordinator at The Samaritan Women, a shelter in Baltimore City for women rescued from domestic sex trafficking. She shared that when she gives presentations about human trafficking to the community, it sometimes elicits a response of sympathy or emotion. What resonated with participants at the storytelling workshop was Mallory’s goal to turn that sympathy into action. Mallory’s task at hand is channeling the community’s sympathetic feelings into actively serving the community.


According to Mallory, this is what true compassion looks like: Service and Action.
​In her role a​s​ a ​volunteer coordinator, she knows the impact one individual can make in the fight against human trafficking, and wants potential volunteers to know that if you act on your concerns, you truly can make a difference.
Mallory reminds us of how important it is to get our own story out there and inspire our community to act.”



Members in Action! – Alisha

Alisha Parzanese is determined to meet every problem with a solution. She says, “My greatest challenge this month was developing the material for the Weed Resistance Program. I decided that I had to take several steps to overcome this challenge. I began looking over material on Montgomery’s Weed Warrior program which was given to me by my Site Supervisor. I decided that we could borrow some of the material from Montgomery counties Weed Warrior program such as documents on volunteer hours, frequently asked questions, prevention of poison ivy and Lyme disease, native alternatives, and a list for targeted invasive plant species. However, I had to rewrite some of this material to incorporate it into our program and to avoid copyright. In addition to looking over other neighboring counties Weed Warrior programs, I had to develop documents for the program such as policy and procedures. To do this, I looked over how to develop policy and procedures in our Volunteer Maryland Training Tool Book. I decided that I had to include policy and procedures on confidentiality, volunteer-client relations, volunteer – staff relations, health and safety, legal liability, volunteer records, dress code, and speaking on behalf of the organization. Throughout the year, I will be updating and developing several other documents such as descriptions for Weed Warrior Peer Squad Leader’s and the material in volunteer’s work packets.”
Alisha proves you can find solutions by looking into other similar programs. She researched and found resources around her and used it to the advantage of her organization.

Members in Action! – Jessica

Jessica Plummer found her belonging in the community by volunteering at her site for the Live Out Loud obstacle run.
She says: “This was my first time attending this event and I volunteered as a spotter for runners. I stood at the top of the hill and cheered runners on to keep going and as runners came up I directed them to the next obstacle so they stayed on course. This was such an exciting time because I was able to see so many of the participants. Moms were running with their daughters, dads with their son’s, entire families and groups of friends all together. These people were running for a cause to raise money to feed the hungry in Calvert County and they were having fun doing it. Friends and families all came out to take pictures and cheer the runners on and capture that moment when the runners finished the race. It was an exciting time and it was a special time because this is a community that I am becoming familiar with and they weren’t just a bunch of strangers but people and faces I am getting to know. So when people came running up it was even more fun to cheer them on because I recognized them and knew their name.
After the races were over I was able to watch the awards ceremony which was really adorable. A young girl made a cape that said End hunger and she wore a tutu and she won the most spirited award. A little 5 year old boy covered in mud won the muddiest award.
The most amazing part was at the very end when the Bertolaccini family stepped up to the platform to acknowledge their son who passed in 2004. After the brief synopsis of Matt’s story they counted to 3 and then together all of the runners, friends and family chanted 3 times “Live Out Loud.” I was amazed at how special this event was. The tragic death of this young teen could have had a lasting crippling effect on the Bertolocinni family yet they chose to turn that pain around and use it for a good purpose.
The impact on the community is a beautiful and positive one. Hundreds of people running together, eating together, listening to music and laughing together all while serving a good cause was a very special moment for me as a volunteer who was new to this event. I felt happy to see the community thriving together and I was honored to serve them.”

It’s great to be a part of community that finds strength, courage and purpose in the face of a tragedy. #PickMeUpWednesday

Members in Action! – Rachel

How do you reengage a forgotten opportunity. Rachel Ebz at St. Francis faced this challenge and accomplished more than expected. She and her site supervisor reached out to a company, MediaStar Promotions that had expressed interest in volunteering. Despite their delay in response, they had a 50 person group volunteer day on November 17th.

According to Rachel, “MediaStar intends to donate time, resources, and support to St. Francis in the way of revamping the Power Bucks store, and redesigning their classrooms, and computer lab! Additionally, 90% of the materials that they are donating and designs that they are implementing will be removable – meaning they can re-apply the designs and materials after the remodel!”

In her own words, “I’m proud that we have identified a solution that can accommodate our capital campaign and our urgent need for structural and design improvements.”